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Posted by on Dec 11, 2017 in Trademark News | 0 comments

The Five Kinds of China Trademark Squatters

We are on record (and then some) about the importance of registering your trademark in China. In spite of our efforts — or perhaps because of them — nearly every week someone contacts us after discovering someone else has registered “their” trademarks in China.

Most people lump all such third party registrants together under the common rubric of “trademark squatters,” but in fact, the registrants can be separated into five distinct categories, and the appropriate response (and the likelihood of success) depends on the category in which category they fall.

Category One – The Extortionist

China’s laissez-faire attitude towards bad-faith trademark registrations has created a cottage industry for numerous “entrepreneurs”: individuals who register brand names belonging to foreign companies and then hold those brand names for ransom. Anyone who deals with China trademarks has run into this sort of trademark squatter. They have filed hundreds of applications, for a wide variety of brand names and in a wide range of Nice classes. The registrations may be for different sorts of goods or services than what the brand is known for. The trademark squatter has no connection to any of the brands, and no intention of ever using them in commerce. They are a classic non-practicing entity, and their sole intent is to monetize the trademark registration by selling it to the highest bidder. They will sometimes approach the trademark owner, or they may sell the trademark to another third party on one of China’s trademark clearinghouse websites. The prices can vary but US$10,000/registration is a common starting bid.

Such registrations are the very definition of bad-faith, and you would think they would be easy to invalidate. Not so. China is slowly getting better at dealing with these situations, but even in egregious cases, it’s far from a slam dunk. The typical route involves an invalidation proceeding and an appeal and then maybe another appeal. All of this can take years and cost thousands of dollars, and there’s no guarantee of success. It’s easy to see why many foreign brand owners just pay the money and move on, as with a nuisance lawsuit. Alternately, some brand owners will wait three years and file a non-use cancellation. See China Trademarks: When (and How) to Prove Use of a Mark in Commerce.

Read the other 4 kinds here.


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